߻   The former house of Chusa, Kim Chŏng-hŭi near Asan.

 

(Click on the picture to view a larger image)

 

This house, consisting of the mens quarters (ä), family quarters (ä), and ancestor shrine (),  is all that remains of the large aristocratic home of the famed scholar and calligrapher Kim Chŏng-hŭi () better known by his Ho (pen-name) as Chusa (1786~1856), that was constructed earlier in the 18th century by Chusas great-grand-father Kim Han-shin (ѽ). It lies some way off the main road linking Asan (site of the Onyang hot springs) with the west coast, on the way to Sudŏk-sa. These photos were taken in November 2003.

 

In order to make this page more easily accessible, I will not include other photos in it, but allow you to view them one by one. They are atmospheric, rather than scientific, so no need for captions.

 

 

 

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Chusas tomb

 

From 1840 until 1848, Chusa Kim Chŏng-hŭi was exiled to the southern island of Cheju and during those years the great Buddhist monk and tea master Cho-ŭi visited him no less than five times, once staying for six months, teaching him about tea and Buddhism. There is a recently built memorial to Chusas exile in south-western Cheju, including a reconstruction of the house he lived in. It is not certain that tea was growing in the island at that time, although nowadays there are many tea plantations. Below are a few photos of the house, of the flowers and tea bushes planted in front of it, and a tea-plantation not far away.

 

 

 

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These and further pictures from Jeju Island can also be viewed in a separate page.

 

 

The Family home of Chung-Mu, Admiral Yi Sun-shin

Memorial Shrine at Asan

 

(Click on the picture to view a larger image)

 

Koreas greatest national hero was born on April 28, 1545. He died at the battle of Noryang, on November 19, 1598. This much restored house, not open for public viewing, continued to be used by his descendants until fairly recently. In the late 1960s, the site was transformed into a large shrine-park, containing a memorial musuem as well as a hall for offerings. The pictures here are all centered on this house.

 

 

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